Cervical cancer screening in Canada: Monitoring and evaluation of quality indicators – Results report 2011 to 2013 (2016)

Find information in this 2016 report about cervical screening coverage, follow-up, quality, pre-cancer and cancer detection and disease extent for the years 2011 to 2013

Find information in this 2016 report about cervical screening coverage, follow-up, quality, pre-cancer and cancer detection and disease extent for the years 2011 to 2013

This report focuses on the results of 12 performance measures for women 21 to 69 years of age. To provide baseline data and examine screening of young women over time, this report also includes screening of women 18 to 20 years of age. That’s because the programs changed the start age for cervical screening to 21 years of age. The report also includes information on HPV testing and HPV vaccination.

Organized cervical screening programs are becoming more organized across the country, although in some jurisdictions, cervical screening is conducted opportunistically by primary care providers rather than through organized screening programs. The programs offer ways to lessen cervical cancer’s burden on the health-care system and to evaluate screening’s effectiveness.

From 1977 to 2015, the incidence of invasive cervical cancer declined from 15.4 per 100,000 to an estimated 7.5 per 100,000

The introduction of cervical cancer screening using the Pap test has significantly reduced illness and deaths from cervical cancer in Canada. From 1977 to 2015, the incidence of invasive cervical cancer declined from 15.4 per 100,000 to an estimated 7.5 per 100,000. Deaths from invasive cervical cancer declined from 4.8 per 100,000 to an estimated 1.6 per 100,000.

It is critical to continuously monitor and evaluate cervical cancer screening to make sure that Canadian women receive high-quality services to prevent cancer.

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