Foundational work

Improving the cancer experience of First Nations, Inuit and Métis throughout the continuum of care

2007 to 2017

In 2007, the Partnership began a comprehensive process to engage with First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners to scope priorities and determine how to address cancer care priorities. The work was guided by the Partnership’s National Indigenous Organization Caucus, which included representatives from the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and the Métis National Council. The result of this engagement was the first-ever Action Plan on First Nations, Inuit and Métis Cancer Control.

The Partnership also began to address the data gap with baseline reports that described the cancer journey of First NationsInuit and Métis, shining a light on inequities and identifying opportunities for action. Across the country, through Partnership-funded initiatives, First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners began to build new relationships with cancer agencies, as they worked together to make cancer services more culturally appropriate and accessible. Lessons learned and promising practices from this work and other efforts were shared in national gatherings among partners, patients, communities and organizations working to improve the cancer experience of First Nations, Inuit and Métis.

First Nations, Inuit and Métis cancer control initiative

Launched in March 2014, the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Cancer Control Initiative (also referred to as the Continuity of Care Initiative) aimed to advance improvements in continuity of care in a culturally responsive and safe way, particularly with First Nations, Inuit and Métis cancer patients residing in rural, remote and isolated communities.

The 10 multi-jurisdiction/multi-year initiatives (2014-2017)

map of Canada indicating funded partners from 2007 to 2017

The Partnership invested in 10 multi-jurisdiction/multi-year initiatives in Yukon, Northwest Territories, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador. These initiatives focused on improving supports provided at the time of diagnosis, and at several points throughout care including patients’ return from treatment centres to their home community. Each initiative is summarized on its own page.